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consequences for it. >> he has been compared to lyndon johnson i think lyndon johnson used profanity strategically and as a bully tactic. when you're in a position of rahm emmanuel and you swear at somebody you can swear at them but they can't swear at you. just the fact that you're using profanity. one of the cases where this came up, this was in jonathan aldridge's book "the promise" take your f-ing tampons out and tell me what you have to have to say. that came up when a former senator wanted to make his temperament an issue. she said, no tampons. let's talk about tampons. this is not about tampons but how women would feel about someone who does that in the workplace. so i would say that it lowered the tone of the mayoral debates. >> after--sorry, after that the mayor grabbed me by the arm. his bodyguards came in. the question is has it been an affective management strategy in chicago? can you talk about the union strike, how did it go? how did it go when the mayor behaved this way? >> i would say no, because one of the most famous stories he was meeting with karen lewis president
is the enemy. lyndon johnson if you read about his efforts of mail order purchasing of guns, he moved that measure in a matter of months, and he was the master of this process. and he understood that time really was the enemy in terms of getting these measures through. to be the extent we can get a strong comprehensive package moving in the senate, get it out of the senate, and then basically surround the house with the executive branch senate action and public opinion that then i actually think this could get a life of its own and really have a strong chance. >> john: connecticut democratic congressman joe courtney, thank you for coming on the program. >> thanks, john. >> john: for more now on the president's proposals i'm happy to be joined by john rosenthal. stop handgun violence and common sense about kids an guns, and by pam simon a staffer for gabby giffords who was shot at the tucson shop shooting where the congressman was badly wounded and six others were killed. she's now a gun control advocate advocate. thank you both for joining us, john, i want to begin with you. >> thank
of the democratic party. and yet it set in motion the events that led to the challenging of lyndon johnson. so i think unfortunately history becomes political, and we pick and choose what we refer to emphasize, but dr. king was gradual. he was slow to come to an open stance. he knew what the stakes were. he wasn't unaware. he wasn't innocent. he knew he would have trouble taking that position, and he took it forthrightly, and proudly, and stayed with it. >> john: kris let me ask you the same question. do you think that another great tragedy of dr. king's loss is he's only remembered as a civil rights icon and not as a non-violent resistence icon or labor rights icon. >> he's so much bigger than the box we tend to put him in. in some of those speeches, in the antiwar speeches he was talking about moving beyond tribe, race, class and nation. that's the kind of radical internationalism that we really don't talk about. even president obama's speech today he's saying we're really loyal not to party but to nations. well, king went far beyond that and say we're not loyal to nations. we're loyal to god.
, the first president to actually ride in a bulletproof car was lyndon johnson in 1965, michael shure. the first president to ride in a car at all, excuse me, david shuster, are you there? the first president to ride in a ceremony in a car was warren harding back in 1921. so shuster, can you see from where you are. you've got a unique spot looking back at the capitol. can you see any of that happening? >> yeah, we can see over to constitution avenue. can see the crowds blocked off. we can see the monitor. what i wanted to say about the motorcade is a couple of things. first of all, in order to prepare pennsylvania avenue for this path, they removed something like 25 different stoplights that were on poles and the other thing that they do as part of security is early this morning, the electric company and gas company will go manhole cover by manhole cover, prop them open, make sure nothing is underneath and put a little x of spray paint and we would it shut. they know that pennsylvania avenue has been cleared. so it is a fascinating process to get pennsylvania ready for this motorcade.
, and lyndon b. johnson in six years as majority leader faced one, and harry reid has faced 361 in the same six-year period. and even if you have the 60 votes to end one, they take up the power of the senate. >> stephanie: you know what is interesting. they just did this study -- this is no surprise to you, but the 112th congress was the most polarized ever. the distance between the two due to record levels between the 111th and 112th even different than the before when they used to take out pistols and shoot each over. >> yes. >> stephanie: i look at poll after poll -- i mean 90% of the american people want background checks for gun -- and you think -- and yet you hear over and over we're probably not going to be able to get any of this gun stuff done. but this is part of the reason right? >> it is part of the reason. why are we talking about reducing food stamps and hunger programs at a time when we can't even close a loophole for a oil company. well, it's a filibuster. dream act, why couldn't we do it? filibuster. and we had 59 votes to close debate, and we needed 6
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)